Short course

Learn our custom designed short courses and be ahead of any danger

Accident Reporting & Investigations

How to accurately report and investigate accidents.

Introduction

This course will help you to maintain a safe and healthy environment by correcting situations that caused or could likely cause injury. When an accident occurs, it is important to report the occurrence so actions such as an investigation can be taken to make sure that a similar or more serious incident does not happen again.

In this course, you will learn the reasons for reporting and investigating accidents, how to identify accident causations, understanding the new accident procedures and investigation and reporting, use of the HSG 245 Accident Investigation Tool and many more useful  techniques.

Course Outlines

1. Quality Assurance process and Delegate Certification process

2. Aim

3. Objective

4. Reasons

5. What is an Accident and an Incident?

6. Level of investigation

7. Why should we investigate both accidents and incidents?

8. Behavioural safety – human factors in accidents

9. Immediate cause: unsafe conditions

10. Immediate cause: unsafe acts

11. Unsafe acts – human failings

12. Accident investigation cause analysis terms (HSG 245)

13. Accident response and reporting stage

14. Accident response and reporting (actual investigation starts)

15. Accident reporting

16. Late reporting

Asbestos

Examines the dangers associated with asbestos and legal responsibilities.

Introduction

Asbestos is a mineral based material that has the characteristic that it does not burn.  However, it is also highly toxic and asbestos fibres cause irreversible damage to the lungs when inhaled. Before its toxicity was understood, it was frequently used in buildings, clothing, household items etc. as protection against heat, fire and as a form of insulation up to 1985 when the use of certain types was first banned in the UK.

This course will raise awareness of the effects of asbestos and enable those who own or are responsible for the repair and maintenance

of older commercial and private properties more likely to incorporate asbestos in their construction to identify and deal with asbestos, and meet their legal ‘Duty to Manage’.

Course Outlines

1. Asbestos

2. Managing asbestos in buildings

3. Why manage asbestos?

4. Who is at risk?

5. Where is asbestos found in buildings?

6. High risk materials

7. Normal risk materials

8.  When is asbestos a hazard?

9.  Health effects

10. What does the ‘duty to manage’ asbestos involve?

11.  Limit asbestos exposure

12.  Checklist

Working at Height

Safety procedures for Working at Height.

Introduction

Working at Height is work undertaken in any place, including a place at, above, or below ground level, where a person could be injured if they fall from that place. Access and egress to a place of work can also be known as Working at Height. It does not include stairways or slips or trips on the level. This Working at Height training will explain how to work on roofs, with ladders, with excavations, scaffolds, mobile elevating work platforms and storage tanks.o Manage’.

Course Outlines

1. Asbestos

2. Managing asbestos in buildings

3. Why manage asbestos?

4. Who is at risk?

5. Where is asbestos found in buildings?

6. High risk materials

7. Normal risk materials

8.  When is asbestos a hazard?

9.  Health effects

10. What does the ‘duty to manage’ asbestos involve?

11.  Limit asbestos exposure

12.  Checklist

Slips, Trips & Falls

The prevention of slips, trips and falls in the workplace.

Introduction

Slips, trips and falls can result in all types of injuries, sometimes serious, and sometimes injuries that leave the victim with a lifelong disability or even lead to death. This kind of incident is second only to car accidents. This is why slip, trip and fall awareness and protection are essential elements of personal safety. This training will show you how to avoid risks and dangers related to slips, trips and falls.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Risk factors

Risk Assessment & Management

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Introduction

This training gives you guidance and a methodology to use risk assessment as a tool to identify, evaluate, and control risks in the workplace to create a safe and healthy work environment. The objective of the course is to equip the participants with the knowledge and skills that would enable them to introduce a system for the conduct of risk assessments within their workplaces and the process of managing the risk assessments and to train others in risk assessment and management.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. What is risk?

3. Failure modes and effect analysis

4. Practical risk assessment

Workplace Transport Safety

Safety training for those involved in workplace transport

Introduction

Every year a significant number of people lose their lives through accidents involving vehicles in the workplace, and many more people are injured. A lot of damage is also done to property and profit. Better planning, training and awareness, and the appropriate use of vehicles, can avoid most of these accidents. This training is aimed at both managers and operators and identifies some of the common safety issues for vehicle operations.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Loading and unloading

Hand & Arm Vibration

Outlines the dangers of exposure to vibration and how to prevent injuries..

Introduction

Hand-arm vibration occurs through the use of hand-held power tools and is the cause of significant ill health (painful and disabling disorders of the blood vessels, nerves and joints). In this course you will be able to find out about the health effects of exposure to vibration, hand-arm vibration syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, legal control measures and exposure levels.

Course Outlines

1. What is Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome?

2. Health effects of exposure to vibration

3. What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

4. Symptoms of CTS

5. What the law says

6. Control measures

7. EAV and ELV explained

8. Points system

9. Monitoring vibration exposure

10. Responsibilities

11. Mandatory health surveillance – employees

12. Mandatory health surveillance – tiers

13. Managing health surveillance – managers

14.How do I know if I have HAVS?

Working in Confined Spaces

Working in confined spaces, associated risks, and the law.

Introduction

A confined space is any space, including any vessel, tank, container, pit, chamber, cellar or any other similar space which, by virtue of its enclosed nature, creates conditions that give rise to a likelihood of an accident, harm or injury.  This training will give you the knowledge to work safely in such high risk places and within the Confined Spaces Regulations 1997.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Attendants, entrants and entry

3. Hazardous atmosphere

Safe Working with Electricity

Basic measures to control the risks of potential electrical hazards.

Introduction

Electricity can kill or severely injure people and cause damage to property. This course will provide some basic measures to help you control the risks of potential electrical hazards. It provides instruction on how to recognise electrical hazards, ways to eliminate and prevent them and the importance of observing all electrical safety requirements and Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. There is also advice on what to do in the event of an electrical accident.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Hazard Recognition

3. Electrical Injuries

4. Electrical Hazard Protection

5. How to respond to or report a problem

Fire Training

Exploring fire prevention and safety in the workplace.

Introduction

This Fire Training course will equip you with the knowledge needed to identify fire hazards by understanding what makes a fire. Once you know that you can understand how to prevent fires and how to extinguish them.

The course will explore the classifications of fire, fire extinguishers and other means of extinguishing fires, when to use each and why, and in some cases why not.

We will examine the best method to use to tackle fires, and what to do if you encounter a fire, including safe evacuation procedures.  Fire prevention is explored and what each individual can do. We will also have a look at what to do if there is a bomb scare at your workplace.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. What makes a fire?

3. Heat sources

4. Fuel sources

5. Oxygen source

6. Classes of fire

7. Types of extinguisher

8. Where can you use these extinguishers?

9. Maintenance of extinguishers

10. How to use an extinguisher

11. Fire escapes and fire escape routes

12. What to do if you find a fire at work

13. Everyday precautions

14. Bomb threats

COSHH

The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations.

Introduction

Using chemicals or other hazardous substances at work can put people’s health at risk, so the law requires employers to control exposure to hazardous substances to prevent ill health. Employers have a legal duty to protect employees and others who may be exposed by complying with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations. If you are an employer and you fail to adequately control hazardous substances, your employees or others may become ill. Effects arising from exposure to hazardous substances range from mild eye irritation to chronic lung disease and on occasions death, depending on the substance concerned.

This may:

Result in lost productivity to your business

Leave you liable to enforcement action, including prosecution under the COSHH Regulations

Result in civil claims from your employees

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Hazard Recognition

3. Electrical Injuries

4. Electrical Hazard Protection

5. How to respond to or report a problem

Excavation Safety

Safe working practices when operating in and around excavations.

Introduction

Working in and around excavations can pose substantial risks even for the most experienced worker, if proper working practices and safety measures are ignored. Earth can shift without warning and the excavation can collapse, trapping anyone working within it.

Proper safety measures, shoring up sides of excavations and utilising the proper support systems, can greatly reduce risk and with careful and regular monitoring, especially after rainfall or prolonged dry periods can help ensure the safety of workers.

This course will explain what consitutes an excavation, the various methods of stabilising the sides of excavations, using the earth itself or constructing bespoke safety systems. Highlighting what can go wrong allows delegates to spot problems before they become crises and make excavations, or the workers in them, safe.  And risks go beyond collapses, and these are explored and examined, such as objects falling into the excavation, overhead power lines and the build up of fumes or liquids within the excavation.  

At the end of the course delegates will have a far better idea of how to manage and work in excavations safely.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Soil and stability

3. Excavated material and equipment

Ladder Safety

Using ladders and scaffolds safely

Introduction

Ladders are commonly used to reach or to gain access to higher areas/levels and sometimes from which to perform work. There are a number of hazards associated with ladder use that can cause accidents resulting in serious injuries. This course highlights the importance of preventing falls from ladders and scaffolds which are a major concern on construction sites.  

Completing the course will equip you with the knowledge to use ladders safely and avoid major and minor accidents in different workplaces.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. A toolbox talk on leaning ladder and step ladder safety

3. Why talk about ladders?

4. Examples of leaning ladder accidents

5. Examples of step ladder accidents

6. Three important things to consider

Section 1

    i  . Hazards

    ii . Pre-use checks

Section 2

    i  . Positioning all types of ladder

    ii . Positioning leaning ladders

    iii. Positioning step ladders   

Section 3

    i  . Safe use of all types of ladder

    ii . Safe use of leaning ladders

    iii. Safe use of step ladders

Grinder Safety

Safety procedures and safeguards associated with grinders.

Introduction

Hand-held grinders can cause serious injury if used incorrectly. By following the safe work practices explained in this training, you can help reduce the risk of injuring yourself or others while using these powerful tools. This grinder safety training will show you how to operate grinders safely and is designed for employees and employers to provide details of basic safety procedures and safeguards associated with grinders.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Proper handling of grinders

3. Angle grinders

Manual Handling

Safe manual handling techniques to avoid injury.

Introduction

Manual Handling involves any transporting or supporting of any load by one or more employees, and includes lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving a load, which by reason of its characteristics or unfavourable ergonomic conditions, involves risk, particularly of back injury, to employees. This course shows you how to improve manual handling techniques, move and handle loads safely and to conduct a personal manual handling risk assessment.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Reducing manual handling injuries

3. Handling training and good techniques

Working Safely with DSE

How to avoid discomfort, injury and strains while working with VDUs.

Introduction

DSE (Display Screen Equipment) is the accepted term for the monitor screen used with most computers or workstations. Long-term use of DSE can lead to discomfort such as sore or tired eyes and it is recommended that DSE users take a short rest from the screen during every hour of use.
This course will help you work comfortably at your work station in a manner that will avoid RSI and other injuries and strains, an assessment to check the setup of your DSE workstation, using a desktop, laptop or using DSE at home for business purposes.

Course Outlines

1. Repetitive Strain Injury

2. What is a work station?

3. Chairs

4. The backrest

5. The seat

6. The casters

7. The desk

8. The keyboard

9. The mouse

10. Alleviating RSI

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

A course covering all aspects of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)

Introduction

Manual Handling involves any transporting or supporting of any load by one or more employees, and includes lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving a load, which by reason of its characteristics or unfavourable ergonomic conditions, involves risk, particularly of back injury, to employees. This course shows you how to improve manual handling techniques, move and handle loads safely and to conduct a personal manual handling risk assessment.

Course Outlines

1. Introduction

2. Eyes, Face and Head Protection

3. Hand, Hear, Feet and Body Protection

Frequently Asked Questions

how can i enroll to any course?

Yes, you are free to enroll anytime by visiting our main branch

What is your refund policy?
We offer no-questions-asked refunds to all customers within 30 days of your purchase. If you are not satisfied with our product, then simply send us an email and we will refund your purchase right away. Our goal has always been to create a happy, thriving community. If you are not thrilled with the product or are not enjoying the experience, then we have no interest in forcing you to stay an unhappy member.
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